• VT-Racing
  • VT-Racing
  • jquery slider
  • VT-Racing
VT-Racing1 VT-Racing2 VT-Racing3 VT-Racing4
jquery slideshow by WOWSlider.com v8.6

Following the decision of Peru to withdraw from the 2016 edition, the Dakar has leaned on its knowledge of the Argentinean and Bolivian territories to come up with an alternate route. Thanks to the unwavering support of the Argentinian government as well as of the Bolivian authorities, the new route calls for daring, on the technical and high-speed stages… but not only.

In three and a half months' time the Dakar's competitors and teams will finally come together in Buenos Aires! After three weeks' intense work on the ground together with the authorities of the host countries, who have shown exceptional capability, the rally teams have been able to design a route whose features remain faithful to the values of the event in every respect.

Following The Decision

Thanks to the immediate involvement and unfailing commitment of the Bolivian and Argentinian authorities, we have found the right technical solutions to take on the new challenge posed to us at the end of August. The loyalty of the institutions in the two countries to the Dakar means we are now in a position to offer competitors a quality event for 2016,” says Dakar General Manager Etienne Lavigne.

While the dates, the number of stages and the distance of the stages will remain the same, the nature of the terrain proposed will force the competitors to employ a different driving approach and shift up one gear. There will be fewer dunes and more technical tracks on the opening three days, which will take the rally to San Salvador de Jujuy. Then, a new idea has been devised to reach Bolivia, particularly the bivouac at Uyuni, where vehicles from all the categories will come together this time. “Before arriving there, the competitors will be placed in a new marathon configuration,” explains Marc Coma, Sporting Director of the event. “We are going to set up a strict Parc Fermé at Jujuy while the support vehicles drive the long route to Uyuni. The Bolivian section maintains the feature of three days' racing at high altitude”.

has recently supervised the reconnaissance for this part of the race, cautions precisely that “the idea of endurance will live up to all its meaning on these stages, because the bikes and quads will have to cope with a second marathon stage in week two. I have a feeling that changes at the sharp end of the general classification will be more than likely on these stages.”

  • The Bolivian
  • Drivers

After having reached Salta for the 10 January rest day, the Dakar will head to Rosario by taking the route initially designed for the 2016 edition. The six stages to be contested in the foothills of the Andes were concocted precisely to offer a demanding and complicated end of the rally, with sandy stages, most notably in the Fiambala sector. The Sporting Director of the event, Marc Coma, who has recently supervised the reconnaissance for this part of the race, cautions precisely that “the idea of endurance will live up to all its meaning on these stages, because the bikes and quads will have to cope with a second marathon stage in week two. I have a feeling that changes at the sharp end of thebe more than likely on these stages.”

After having reached Salta for the 10 January rest day, the Dakar will head to Rosario by taking the route initially designed for the 2016 edition. The six stages to be contested in the foothills of the Andes were concocted precisely to offer a demanding and complicated end of the rally, with sandy stages, most notably in the Fiambala sector. The Sporting Director of the event, Marc Coma, who has recently supervised the reconnaissance for this part of the race, cautions precisely that “the idea of endurance will live up to all its meaning on these stages, because the bikes and quads will have to cope with a second marathon stage in week two. I have a feeling that changes at the sharp end of thebe more than likely on these stages.”

After having reached Salta for the 10 January rest day, the Dakar will head to Rosario by taking the route initially designed for the 2016 edition. The six stages to be contested in the foothills of the Andes were concocted precisely to offer a demanding and complicated end of the rally, with sandy stages, most notably in the Fiambala sector. The Sporting Director of the event, Marc Coma, who has recently supervised the reconnaissance for this part of the race, cautions precisely that “the idea of endurance will live up to all its meaning on these stages, because the bikes and quads will have to cope with a second marathon stage in week two. I have a feeling that changes at the sharp end of thebe more than likely on these stages.”

After having reached Salta for the 10 January rest day, the Dakar will head to Rosario by taking the route initially designed for the 2016 edition. The six stages to be contested in the foothills of the Andes were concocted precisely to offer a demanding and complicated end of the rally, with sandy stages, most notably in the Fiambala sector. The Sporting Director of the event, Marc Coma, who has recently supervised the reconnaissance for this part of the race, cautions precisely that “the idea of endurance will live up to all its meaning on these stages, because the bikes and quads will have to cope with a second marathon stage in week two. I have a feeling that changes at the sharp end of thebe more than likely on these stages.”

After having reached Salta for the 10 January rest day, the Dakar will head to Rosario by taking the route initially designed for the 2016 edition. The six stages to be contested in the foothills of the Andes were concocted precisely to offer a demanding and complicated end of the rally, with sandy stages, most notably in the Fiambala sector. The Sporting Director of the event, Marc Coma, who has recently supervised the reconnaissance for this part of the race, cautions precisely that “the idea of endurance will live up to all its meaning on these stages, because the bikes and quads will have to cope with a second marathon stage in week two. I have a feeling that changes at the sharp end of thebe more than likely on these stages.”

 

Most

of the works drivers of the 1950s were amateurs, paid little or nothing, reimbursed their expenses and given bonuses for winning (although there were certainly exceptions, such as the Grand Prix drivers who were brought in for some events). Then in 1960 came arguably the first rallying superstar (and one of the first to be paid to rally full-time), Sweden's Erik Carlsson, driving for Saab.

In the 1960s, the competitions manager of BMC, Stuart Turner, hired a series of brave and gifted young Finns, skills honed on their country's highly competitive gravel or snow rallies, and the modern professional driver was born. As special stage rallying spread around the world Scandinavian drivers were challenged by drivers from Italy, Germany, Britain, Spain and elsewhere. Today, a World Champion may be of any nationality.

The World Rally Championship now visits nearly all continents, taking its stylish sideways driving style and specialized cars to a vast global market, estimated by some to be second only to the Formula One juggernaut. This has produced unprecedented levels of visibility in recent years, but in many ways removed the motorsport from its grassroots past. For better or worse, rally has become a lucrative business.


History

The term "rally", as a branch of motorsport, probably dates from the first Monte Carlo Rally of January 1911. Until the late 1920s, few if any other events used the term.[1] Rallying itself can be traced back to the 1894 Paris–Rouen Horseless Carriage Competition (Concours des Voitures sans Chevaux), sponsored by a Paris newspaper, Le Petit Journal, which attracted considerable public interest and entries from leading manufacturers. Prizes were awarded to the vehicles by a jury based on the reports of the observers who rode in each car; the official winner was Albert Lemaître driving a 3 hp Peugeot, although the Comte de Dion had finished first but his steam powered vehicle was ineligible for the official competition.[2]

This event led directly to a period of city-to-city road races in France and other European countries, which introduced many of the features found in later rallies: individual start times with cars running against the clock rather than head to head; time controls at the entry and exit points of towns along the way; road books and route notes; and driving over long distances on ordinary, mainly gravel, roads, facing hazards such as dust, traffic, pedestrians and farm animals.

The first of these great races was the Paris–Bordeaux–Paris race of June 1895, won by Paul Koechlin in a Peugeot, despiting arriving 11 hours after Émile Levassor in a Panhard et Levassor.[3] Levassor's time for the 1,178 km (732 mi) course, running virtually without a break, was 48 hours and 48 minutes, an average speed of 24 km/h (15 mph).[4] Just eight years later, in the Paris–Madrid race of May 1903, the Mors of Fernand Gabriel (fr), running over the same roads, took just under five and a quarter hours for the 550 km (340 mi) to Bordeaux, an average of 105 km/h (65.3 mph). Speeds had now far outstripped the safe limits of dusty highways thronged with spectators and open to other traffic, people and animals; there were numerous crashes, many injuries and eight deaths. The French government stopped the race and banned this style of event.[5] From then on, racing in Europe (apart from Italy) would be on closed circuits, initially on long loops of public highway and then, in 1907, on the first purpose-built track, England's Brooklands.[6] Racing was going its own separate way.

Rally types

There are two main forms: stage rallies and road rallies. Since the 1960s, stage rallies have been the professional branch of the sport. They are based on straightforward speed over stretches of road closed to other traffic. These may vary from asphalt mountain passes to rough forest tracks, from ice and snow to desert sand, each chosen to provide an enjoyable challenge for the crew and a test of the car's performance and reliability.

The entertaining and unpredictable nature of the stages, and the fact that the vehicles are in some cases closely related to road cars, means that the bigger events draw massive spectator interest, especially in Europe, Asia and Oceania.
An Escort RS Cosworth on a stage rally, driven by British driver Malcolm Wilson

Road rallies are the original form, held on highways open to normal traffic, where the emphasis is not on outright speed but on accurate timekeeping and navigation and on vehicle reliability, often on difficult roads and over long distances. They are now primarily amateur events. There are several types of road rallies testing accuracy, navigation or problem solving. Some common types are: Regularity rally or a Time-Speed-Distance rally (also TSD rally, testing ability to stay on track and on time),[59] others are Monte-Carlo styles (Monte Carlo, Pan Am, Pan Carlo, Continental) rally (testing navigation and timing), and various Gimmick rally types (testing logic and observation).

Many early rallies were called trials, and a few still are, although this term is now mainly applied to the specialist form of motor sport of climbing as far as you can up steep and slippery hills. And many meets or assemblies of car enthusiasts and their vehicles are still called rallies, even if they involve merely the task of getting there (often on a trailer).

Rallying is a very popular sport at the "grass roots" of motorsport—that is, motor clubs. Individuals interested in becoming involved in rallying are encouraged to join their local automotive clubs. Club rallies (e.g. road rallies or regularity rallies) are usually run on public roads with an emphasis on navigation and teamwork. These skills are important fundamentals required for anyone who wishes to progress to higher-level events. (See Categories of rallies.) Short special stage practice events on public roads are in some countries organized by the local clubs, with a permission of the local police, the community normally using the road, and the road authority. The public road is closed during these by the organisers or the police.

0